Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Mercury Poisoning

Mercury Poisoning

In December 2011, EPA issued the first national standards for mercury pollution from power plants. MATS are the first national standards to protect American families from power plant emissions of mercury and toxic air pollution like arsenic, acid gas, nickel, selenium, and cyanide. The standards will slash emissions of these dangerous pollutants by relying on widely available, proven pollution controls that are already in use at more than half of the nation's coal-fired power plants. Read the press release | Learn more about these actions | Read the final rule (PDF).

Mercury poisoning (also known as hydrargyria or mercurialism) is a disease caused by exposure to mercury or its compounds. Mercury (chemical symbol Hg) is a heavy metal occurring in several forms, all of which can produce toxic effects in high enough doses. Its zero oxidation state Hg0 exists as vapor or as liquid metal, its mercurous state Hg+ exists as inorganic salts, and its mercuric state Hg2+ may form either inorganic salts or organ mercury compounds; the three groups vary in effects. Toxic effects include damage to the brain, kidney, and lungs.  Mercury poisoning can result in several diseases, including acrodynia (pink disease), Hunter-Russell syndrome, and Minamata disease.

Symptoms of mercury poisoning typically include sensory impairment (vision, hearing, speech), disturbed sensation and a lack of coordination. The type and degree of symptoms exhibited depend upon the individual toxin, the dose, and the method and duration of exposure.

Mercury Toxicity Limits

Country
Regulating agency
Regulated activity
Medium
Type of mercury compound
Type of limit
Limit
US
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
occupational exposure
air
elemental mercury
Ceiling (not to exceed)
0.1 mg/m³
US
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
occupational exposure
air
organic mercury
Ceiling (not to exceed)
0.05 mg/m³
US
Food and Drug Administration
drinking
water
inorganic mercury
Maximum allowable concentration
2 ppb (0.002 mg/L)
US
Food and Drug Administration
eating
seafood
methylmercury
Maximum allowable concentration
1 ppm (1 mg/L)
US
Environmental Protection Agency
drinking
water
inorganic mercury
Maximum contaminant level
2 ppb (0.002 mg/L)

1 comment:

Ross Taylor said...

It's an excellent and very informative article. I read your blog, I got some avoiding mercury poisoning information. Mercury is included in some of the seafood we eat, whether captured in regional ponds and sources or purchased in a food market. Mercury is also included in some of the items we use, which may be discovered in your house, at the dental professional, and at educational institutions. here are three kinds of mercury harming. The condition can be brought on by fluid mercury, natural mercury, and inorganic mercury. Visibility can be either acute one large dose or chronic, with a little amount consumed eventually. With less than 200,000 situations revealed nationwide, mercury harming is categorized as a unusual condition by the National Institutions of Wellness. Market Research Reports